North Cascades National Park Climate

Generally, the best weather for visiting the North Cascades occurs between mid-June and late-September. Snow is off all but the highest trails by July. Autumn and Spring are becoming more popular for visits since car tours of the Skagit, Okanogan and Stehekin Valleys are enticing for color and wildlife during the less busy "shoulder seasons". Day hikes are excellent and give a great taste of the wilderness, whenever the weather is good. Storms are common: always be prepared for a few days of rain and wind. Particularly if you are going into high and remote areas, take good, rain gear and a tent. Warm, waterproof clothing and a tent are virtually mandatory for spring, fall and winter trips into the backcountry. Heavy snow and rain, at high elevations, characterize the North Cascades from fall into spring. Avalanches are common in winter and spring in the higher country and in places along the North Cascades Highway. The east side of the Cascade Mountains (such as Stehekin in Lake Chelan National Recreation Area) is drier and warmer in the summer than the west side (such as the portion of Ross Lake National Recreation Area along the North Cascades Highway). Summer temperatures at Stehekin reach the 90's F. Winter at Stehekin and at all elevations above 2,000' throughout the park complex are snowy from fall into spring.

$149.95
Pick up the Timberland Men's Chillberg Waterproof Boot for waterproof protection from nasty winter weather and...
Price subject to change | Available through Backcountry.com
October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.