African Burial Ground National Monument

Description:

From about the 1690s until 1794, both free and enslaved Africans were buried in a 6.6-acre burial ground in Lower Manhattan, outside the boundaries of the settlement of New Amsterdam, later known as New York. Lost to history due to landfill and development, the grounds were rediscovered in 1991 as a consequence of the planned construction of a Federal office building.

Directions:

The African Burial Ground National Monument is located in Lower Manhattan, close to Foley Square and just north of City Hall. The 4, 5, 6, R trains (Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall) are one block away, the J, M and Z trains are one block away (Chambers Street), the A train is three blocks away (Chambers Street) and the 1 train is 4 blocks away (Chambers Street) and the 2 and 3 trains are 2 blocks away (Park Place). The A, C and E are 3 blocks away (Chambers/World Trade Center). The M15, M22 and B51 City Hall bus routes all terminate within walking distance, and the M1 and M6 South Ferry route passes nearby. Ask the driver for the stop closest to Broadway and Duane Street.

Phone:

Email:

african_burial_ground@nps.gov

Address:

African Burial Ground National Monument 290 Broadway, 1st Floor

New York, NY 10007

Activities:

Organization:

NPS - National Park Service

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