Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument

The Cliff Dwellings, Gila Visitor Center and trailhead Contact Station are open every day of the year, including all holidays.

Extended Summer Hours

From Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day, the trail to the Cliff Dwellings is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The last visitors for the day are allowed up the trail at 5:00 p.m. and everyone must be off the trail by 6:00 p.m. The visitor center is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Regular Hours

The rest of the year (Tuesday after Labor Day through Thursday before Memorial Day Weekend), the trail to the Cliff Dwellings is open from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The last visitors for the day are allowed up the trail at 4:00 p.m. and everyone must be off the trail by 5:00 p.m. The visitor center is open from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The free "Canyon Companion" handout is available at the trailhead Contact Station and staff is present inside the Dwellings at all times to answer questions. Visitors are encouraged to attend guided tours and other programs when they are available.

Please note that New Mexico is on Mountain Time and observes Daylight Saving Time unlike Arizona which is on Mountain Time but does not observe Daylight Saving Time. In the summer, Arizona is one hour behind New Mexico while in the winter the two states are on the same time.

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