Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

President George W. Bush signed into law a plan to create the new Lewis and Clark National Historical Park by incorporating state parks in Washington and Oregon along with the current Fort Clatsop National Memorial Park.

The sites preserved in these parks allow you to walk where Lewis and Clark and the rest of the Corps of Discovery walked. These sites embody the stories of hardship and danger, of surprising collaboration and adaptations, and of exploration and discovery.

Fort Clatsop commemorates the 1805-06 winter encampment of the 33-member Lewis and Clark Expedition. A 1955 community-built replica of the explorers' 50'x50' Fort Clatsop is the focus of the park. The fort, historic canoe landing, and spring are nestled in the coastal forests and wetlands of the Coast Range as it merges with the Columbia River Estuary. There are approximately 2 miles of hiking trails, through woodlands, availble. The park is located approximately 5 miles south of Astoria, Oregon.

The Salt Works unit commemorates the expedition's salt-making activities. Salt obtained from seawater was essential to the explorers' winter at Fort Clatsop and their journey back to the United States in 1806. This site is located in the city of Seaside, Oregon.

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