National Mall

Officially established in 1965, National Mall and Memorial Parks contains some of the oldest protected park lands in the National Park Service. The sprawling lands of the National Mall and Memorial Parks include the Mall, the public promenade extending from 3rd Street near the Capitol to 14th Street. The National Mall is the continuation of that space where congressionally authorized park icons, such as the Washington Monument, WWII and Lincoln Memorials stand. This historic expanse is the linear area between the Potomac River and Capital Reflecting Pool. In addition to the memorial core, the park includes some 156 reservations, circles, fountains and other open spaces, all of which serve as the nation's front yard. Ford's Theatre, The House where Lincoln died, Potomac Park, Hains Point and Pennsylvania Avenue NHS are also among the park managed areas that constitute National Mall and Memorial Parks.

Having over 1,000 acres of National Park Service managed land within the Nation's Capital, National Mall and Memorial Parks provides visitors with abundant opportunities to commemorate presidential legacies; honor the courage, sacrifice and devotion to duty of war veterans; celebrate the United States commitment to freedom, equality and democratic ideals; and enjoy symbolic architecture, historic vistas and renowned natural landscapes.

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November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
Badgers are animals of open country. Their oval burrows (ten inches across and four to six inches high) are familiar features of grasslands on sandy or loamy soils of the eastern plains or shrub country in mountain parks or western valleys.