Thomas Stone National Historic Site

In 1770, when Thomas Stone began the construction of his home he was a modest family man with a promising career as a lawyer and local political figure. Haberdeventure, which literally translates as a "dwelling place of or in the winds", was built by Thomas Stone to be the home he would raise his family in.

By 1776, Thomas Stone's world had changed, no longer just a country lawyer, by signing the Declaration of Independence he had literally written himself into American History. Thomas Stone spent the rest of his life in public service which necessitated moving his family to Annapolis.

Haberdeventure passed down through five generations of Stones until the property was sold in 1936. The property remained in private ownership until New Year's Day 1977 when a fire gutted the central brick section of the house and damaged the west wing. Haberdeventure was authorized as a national historic site in 1978, and was purchased by the National Park Service in 1981. The restored house has been open to the public since 1997.

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