Atomic Tracker MNC 16 Alpine Touring Binding

Atomic Tracker MNC 16 Alpine Touring Binding
$449.99
Tracker MNC 16 Alpine Touring Binding by Atomic
Price subject to change | SKU: ATO004D

Atomic Tracker MNC 16 Alpine Touring Binding

With the retention and release of a traditional alpine binding and touring performance that'll expand your playground, the Atomic Tracker 16 Alpine Touring Binding could definitely be the clamp you use every time you're on snow this season. It skis like an alpine binding, with a rugged U Power toe, oversized platform, and a DIN that goes all the way to 16, but it'll get you up to to those stomach-churning lines you want to ski too, thanks to the 90-degree toe pivot, flat nose, and hike-and-ride switch that can be operated while you're still locked into the binding. The Tracker certainly isn't as light and fast as a tech binding, but if you're more interested in short tours and big lines than long approaches and techy skiing, then it's the right binding for your brand of big mountain skiing. For the most part, the Tracker remains unchanged with the same bomber downhill performance and the added convenience of the Multi-Norm Compatibility (MNC) all intact. The aluminum double tubes have been strengthened for a burlier ride, the stand height checks in at a low and precise 26mm, and the easily adjustable toe piece makes getting the fit and release settings perfect in a matter of minutes. Atomic even simplified the base plate to prevent icing and snow buildup, so you'll spend less time fiddling with your bindings and more time shredding.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.