Basin and Range Uinta Sleeping Bag: 0 Degree Synthetic

Basin and Range Uinta Sleeping Bag: 0 Degree Synthetic
Basin and Range Uinta Sleeping Bag: 0 Degree Synthetic
$118.96
$139.95 15% off
Price subject to change | Ships & sold by Backcountry
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Product Description
Uinta Sleeping Bag: 0 Degree Synthetic by Basin and Range
A leaky hydration bladder can spell disaster for a down sleeping bag, but the Basin and Range Uinta 0 Degree Synthetic Sleeping Bag retains insulating properties when wet, so it won't be game over when you get to the trailhead and realize your reservoir leaked all over your gear. Packed full of a water-resistant synthetic fill and treated with a PFC-free DWR, the Uinta Sleeping Bag is well equipped to deal with wet climates, soggy winter camps, and tent mates that have a tendency to spill the bota bag. The tough 70D fabric is durable enough to withstand those nights spent sleeping out under the stars, and the shingle construction along the top of the bag helps maximize loft for a warmer night's sleep on those especially cold nights. Like the other sleeping bags in the Uinta line, his 0-degree option features an insulated draft tube and 3D hood to help trap precious body heat as you sleep.

Details
SKU: BNG0027
Options, sizes, colors available on Backcountry
Manufactured by Basin and Range
Basin and Range Uinta Sleeping Bag: 0 Degree Synthetic ships and sold by Backcountry
Price subject to change
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