Dalbello Sports Lupo Carbon T.I. Ski Boot

Dalbello Sports Lupo Carbon T.I. Ski Boot
$999.95
Lupo Carbon T.I. Ski Boot by Dalbello Sports
Price subject to change | SKU: DBL002I

Dalbello Sports Lupo Carbon T.I. Ski Boot

Light on weight and heavy on freeride performance, Dalbello's Lupo Carbon T. I. Ski Boot is a match made in heaven for any aggressive backcountry tourer. It's incredible that this backcountry boot can provide such a stiff flex of 130 and still allow a massive 67-degree cuff rotation in walk mode. That's because Dalbello equipped it with a removable tongue and clip at the heel that provide a natural heel motion while skinning while ensuring an aggressive performance on the downhill.Like all Dalbello's top models, the Lupo Carbon T. I. Ski Boot features a Cabrio construction that uses three separate pieces (tongue, cuff, and shell) to give the boot a smoother power transmission, a dynamic rebound, and excellent shock absorption. The shell also features Dalbello's wide Cuff Hyperband buckle that offers more comfort and less friction, while the Inverted forefoot buckle prevents breaking and bending like traditional buckles on the side usually do.Inside the boot, Dalbello inserted a thermo-moldable My Fit Light liner that conforms to your foot after a heating process and stays light and flexible enough to keep you skinning comfortably. Underfoot, the boot's Xtra Grip rubber toe and heel lugs stay solid when you're bootpacking up rocky summits, and you can interchange them with alpine DIN or touring soles for versatility in or out of the resort. Of course, the Lupo Carbon T. I. always accommodates tech bindings for those longer tours.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.