DPS Skis Wailer 106 Tour1 Ski

DPS Skis Wailer 106 Tour1 Ski
$1098.95
Wailer 106 Tour1 Ski by DPS Skis
Price subject to change | SKU: DPK000E

DPS Skis Wailer 106 Tour1 Ski

The Wailer 106 Tour1 Ski is DPS' answer to the resounding question of experience-focused backcountry skiers: "What's the point in grinding through long tours if you have to spend the descent feeling gripped on floppy touring skis'" Choosing a lightweight touring ski often means compromising performance, stiffness, and downhill fun in order to stay skin-track friendly, but the DPS Tour1 construction gives an effective middle finger to that compromise with the use of a poppy, stiff balsa wood core sandwiched by aerospace carbon laminates and a full cap textured polyamide top. The end result is a ski that's comparable in weight to the lightest on the market, but blows the competition away in terms of torsional rigidity, edge control, and dampening.Just because snow conditions don't pan out powdery all the time doesn't mean you'll skip a dawn patrol, but it's nice to have a little float when there's fresh stuff. Whipped up with a versatile 106mm waist, and the Wailer is ready to devour powder, crud, ice, hardpack, and all the fast pre-dawn ascents you can throw at it. A rockered tip and tail with traditional camber underfoot and a chassis-driven sidecut bring the best of both worlds for laying the ski on edge and blasting through crud or pow. Enjoy precision, power, and levity in every type of snow condition, every damn time.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.