Electric EG2 Goggles

Electric EG2 Goggles
$107.97 $179.95 40% off
EG2 Goggles by Electric
Price subject to change | SKU: ELC0831

Electric EG2 Goggles

It's hard to imagine how we moved about the mountain before the Electric EG2 Goggles. Could we see trees and people, or just a hazy blur of snow and shapes' Since its inception, the EG2 has a pure and simple goal--reduce the frame size, increase vision to HD status, and do it all with obscene amounts of style. Oversized isn't supersized and you won't catch flak from big-city mayors for having such a large field of vision. The thermoplastic urethane used in the frame isn't an illness but rather molecular magic. Shaped for maximum comfort, this plastic polymer stays flexible when the bottoms drops out of the thermometer, and resists getting roughed by up branches, poles, or car doors. The oversized dual spherical polycarbonate lens lets you see the clouds above, the snow below, and the skiers and trees on the sides as your ride by. Fog cloud your vision due to the Super Anti-Fog coating, and Super Anti-Reflective coating protects you eyes from glow-back of sun on snow. The frames play well with helmets so you no longer have to choose between protecting your brain and protecting your eyeballs. A 43mm strap keeps the goggles firmly fixed in place, and triple-layer face foam keeps your cheeks happy. The included microfiber bag helps protect your EG2 goggles from boot bottoms and plank edges when you throw them in the back of the van. Proposition 65 Warning for California Consumers: This product contains chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and/or birth defects or other reproductive harm.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.