Ergon SMC3 Comp Saddle

Ergon SMC3 Comp Saddle
$42.98 $99.95 57% off
SMC3 Comp Saddle by Ergon
Price subject to change | SKU: ERG000Z

Ergon SMC3 Comp Saddle

In contrast to its race-oriented SMR3 line, Ergon developed its SMC mountain saddles for riders who don't want to spend every trail ride on an unforgiving carbon shelf but who don't want to ride the equivalent of a throw pillow on a stick. The SMC3 Comp Saddle's titanium rails place it in the middle of the line, with the same shell shape and AirCell cushioning as its siblings and an overall focus on ensuring that a mega-sore ass is never the reason your rides have to end early. Inspired by the thought of riders pedaling their bikes on long tours and rides with no time limits over miles of rolling, rocky trails that resemble a stegosaurus' back, the SMC3 Comp features a fiberglass composite shell perched atop light, dependable, TiNox rails. TiNox is a blend of stainless steel and titanium that's produced in a single, Austrian factory. The blend is actually lighter than standard titanium, but it retains the strength of the wonder alloy. So it's more wonderier. The shell's AirCell padding consists of micro pockets of air that absorb fatiguing trail noise, while a soft, microfiber cover provides a smooth layer against Lycra or baggies and protects the saddle's internals from the elements. Although the saddle is plush, it retains a streamlined shape and weighs a claimed 235g. It's finished with a pressure-relief channel down the center, which creates a well-executed blend of relief and support that won't interfere with power transfer.

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