Faction Skis Supertonic Ski - Women's

Faction Skis Supertonic Ski - Women's
$315.58 $788.95 60% off
Supertonic Ski - Women's by Faction Skis
Price subject to change | SKU: FSK001C

Faction Skis Supertonic Ski - Women's

Tired of having to distract the guys into letting you "borrow" their freeride skis every storm day' They'll only believe the "free beer over there!" trick so many times before they catch on, so before they do, ditch your deceptions for the Faction Supertonic Ski. This full-on freeride machine will have the guys wondering why they're even further behind you on the best lines than before. Faction made the Supertonic for hard-charging ladies. It's got a balsa and flax core that blends poppy responsiveness on playful pillow lines with dampness for stability on stubborn, days-old chop. Looks don't say much of value about a ski, but when your planks ski like these do, a stellar topsheet is the extra few inches on top of the storm day. Your turns won't be the only thing earning you nods of approval when you're ripping around the resort on the Supertonic, and Faction's decision to use a gloss lacquer means those pretty topsheets will stay that way for more than just a few off-piste turns. Faction uses its Tech Rocker to give you springy camber underfoot countered by rockered tips and tails that'll surf their way through soft stuff and power through sludge without getting hung up. At 107 underfoot, the Supertonic can handle chop and chunder as comfortably as mid-deep storm days, and for smaller ladies, even the really deep goods. Faction's P-Tex 4000 bases will keep your crew choking on your roostertail while you race them down the mountain to the real-life beer stash.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.