Fischer Transalp Vacuum TS Lite Alpine Touring Boot

Fischer Transalp Vacuum TS Lite Alpine Touring Boot
$594.96 $849.95 30% off
Transalp Vacuum TS Lite Alpine Touring Boot by Fischer
Price subject to change | SKU: FIS001M

Fischer Transalp Vacuum TS Lite Alpine Touring Boot

Comfortable, mobile, and reasonably skiable touring boots aren't big news anymore, but just because something's been around for a while doesn't mean it can't be improved. Heat-moldable liners are pretty much standard issue these days, but Fischer's Transalp Vacuum TS Lite Alpine Touring Boot takes things a step further with its heat-moldable shell, which allows you to dial in a personalized fit that even grinding, punching, and padding won't give you. Just heat the shell up, just like you would a liner, stick it on, buckle it up, and let it cool--the Vacu-Plast material will expand and then contract to the shape of your foot, improving fit, performance, and comfort. Coupled with the moldable lace-up liner, this gives the Transalp a level of unprecedented customization, so you can kiss hot-spots, slop, and pain goodbye for good. Of course, all the fit technology in the world won't make a good boot all on its lonesome, so Fischer made sure the rest of the Transalp was on point, too. The shell is designed to complement the position our feet tend to take (Fischer calls its ergonomic design features V-Position and On-Center Position), for increased control and comfort, and it has a ski/walk lever that offers a killer 53 degrees of fore-aft rotation for easy skinning. Three X-Lite aluminum buckles pull your foot into the shell without pinching, and a 40mm Touring power strap beefs up the relatively mild 115 flex, so the boots don't get overwhelmed if you're driving wider skis. An adjustable rear spoiler lets you play with the Transalp's 13-degree forward lean, and a grippy Vibram sole makes icy walks, rock scrambling, and parking lot detours a little bit less sketchy.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.