Gnu Forest Bailey Head Space Snowboard

Gnu Forest Bailey Head Space Snowboard
$449.95
Forest Bailey Head Space Snowboard by Gnu
Price subject to change | SKU: GNU004O

Gnu Forest Bailey Head Space Snowboard

Get on the same wavelength as Forest Bailey with his signature Gnu Head Space PBTX Snowboard. Forest's choice for throwing down on the streets and in the park, the Head Space is a jib-focused asymmetric twin that kills it on rails and holds its own on groomers and glades outside the park too. The Head Space's weird science starts with the asymmetric sidecut, which features a deeper heelside sidecut to compensate for your naturally weaker heelside turns. This makes initiating heelside carves and holding an edge much easier and more natural feeling. Continuing with the asymmetrical theme, the Head Space's core features a mix of different woods that gives it a softer flex heelside for easier turn initiation and quicker response. A camber-dominant profile gives Forest all the pop and power he needs for ollieing onto tall rails and boosting off park jumps, while a bit of mild camber between the bindings adds forgiveness when you're spinning on and off park features. A biax and triax fiberglass layup offers the right balance of torsional flexibility and energy transfer, so the board feels playful and forgiving without being a noodle. Tough UHMW sidewalls withstand abuse from rocks and stumps, and the durable sintered base is fast and retains wax well to keep you moving through slow spots. Plus, Gnu snowboards are made in the USA by snowboarders with jobs.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.