Gore Bike Wear Base Layer Windstopper Lady Turtleneck - Women's

Gore Bike Wear Base Layer Windstopper Lady Turtleneck - Women's
$99.95
Base Layer Windstopper Lady Turtleneck - Women's by Gore Bike Wear
Price subject to change | SKU: GBW0339

Gore Bike Wear Base Layer Windstopper Lady Turtleneck - Women's

Show blustery winds who's boss with the Gore Bike Wear Base Layer WindStopper Women's Turtleneck. Like the name implies, it's built to stop cool breezes from chilling you to the bone. And with breathable panels, you won't overheat in the process, either. Something tells us you'll be wearing this one off the bike as well. Gore's WindStopper is renowned for its supreme wind-blocking abilities, as well as its breathability. In other words, while it stops wind from cutting through, the construction of the fabric lends itself to pulling moisture from the inside and transporting it to the surface where it can evaporate. However, for a next-to-skin piece, the ability to expel excess heat is essential, which is why Gore built stretch polypropylene panels into the underarms. There's a 1/4-length zipper, which further allows you to regulate your temperature. The generous sleeve length ensures that it won't ride up, much like the riding-oriented drop tail, which covers your backside when you're in the drops. While it makes for a perfect cold weather riding base layer, odds are that you'll find yourself reaching for this top during a wide range of outdoor pursuits. The Gore Bike Wear Base Layer WindStopper Turtleneck - Long Sleeve - Women's is available in six sizes, from X-Small to XX-Large, and in the colors Black, White, and Light Grey/white.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.