K2 Snowboards Joy Driver Snowboard

K2 Snowboards Joy Driver Snowboard
$649.95
Joy Driver Snowboard by K2 Snowboards
Price subject to change | SKU: K2S00CK

K2 Snowboards Joy Driver Snowboard

Originally developed with the legendary Mt. Baker as its testing ground, the K2 Joy Driver Snowboard is a hard-charging deck for dropping into steep alpine faces and stomping cliff drops into deep powder. It's built on a Shifted Camber profile that's most prominent along the rear inserts for driving powerful turns from the back foot. This camber dominance maintains razor-sharp response, enhanced by the board's stiff flex pattern that holds an edge with devout precision when falling simply isn't an option. Seeing the Joy Driver is a purebred freeride board, it's no surprise it's built on a directional shape that's exceedingly capable straight-lining steeps and floating across bottomless powder. That being said, it's still able to ride and land switch, as the directional bias isn't as drastic as some freeride decks on the market (there's a 0. 75-inch set-back). To maintain buoyancy, K2's Tweekend continuous rocker keeps the nose floating above powder without the tendency to dive underneath like a pure camber board. Delving inside the board, you'll find K2's Bambooyah core provides powerful snap and response, as well as making it insanely durable. K2 backs up this core with a five year warranty just to prove its strength, meaning you'll have no problem trusting this board on bigger cliff drops and sketchy landings. Triax fiberglass maintains a stiffer torsional feel for advanced riders desiring a precision scalpel for carving. And as you'd expect from a board of this caliber, the sintered base is both faster and tougher than its cheaper extruded counterparts.

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