Scarpa F1 Alpine Touring Boot - Women's

Scarpa F1 Alpine Touring Boot - Women's
$698.95
F1 Alpine Touring Boot - Women's by Scarpa
Price subject to change | SKU: SCR003R

Scarpa F1 Alpine Touring Boot - Women's

Ski boot design is pretty much played out. Everything that can be done has been done, so you might as well hang on to your eight-year-old AT boots, grit your teeth, and keep skinning, right' Right' Nope. The Scarpa Women's F1 Alpine Touring Boot, while it's still recognizably a ski boot, is changing the game, and you might want to take a closer look. How' Well, the F1 manual ski-walk mechanism, for starters, gives you a staggering 62 degrees of cuff rotation for super-speedy transitions and buttery-smooth skinning. A smooth-flexing Pebax tongue and stiffer HPA cuff and shell cinch around your foot with the same BOA ratchet-closure system found in the ultralight Alien, giving you a smooth, pinch-free fit without the need for heavy buckles. The women-specific cuff closes via a FBC (fast buckle closure) powerstrap, letting you get every ounce of power out of the 95 flex, and a Carbon Core insert and HPA cuff structure make the F1 ski more like the burlier Maestrale while keeping the weight in Alien territory. There are two forward lean settings, too, so you can fine-tune the F1 to your stance, and the women-specific Intuition liner (which has a skinning-ready flex zone over the Achilles) and roomy 102mm last serve up a tasty blend of performance and all-day comfort. The toe and heel welts were designed with crampons in mind, so you'll be ready to rumble when you hit some blue ice. To top it all off, there's aVibram UFO EVO sole for serious traction on rocks and hard snow, and an extra removable power strap over the liner,just in case.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.