Scarpa Freedom Alpine Touring Boot - Women's

Scarpa Freedom Alpine Touring Boot - Women's
$519.16 $648.95 20% off
Freedom Alpine Touring Boot - Women's by Scarpa
Price subject to change | SKU: SCR002N

Scarpa Freedom Alpine Touring Boot - Women's

There's a lot to be said for a pure touring set-up, but it doesn't come cheap. If striking a balance between uphill and downhill performance without breaking the bank on new boots and bindings is more your style, the Scarpa Freedom Women's Alpine Touring Boot is probably something you'll be into. The Freedom has Vibram Mountain Piste rubber soles, which are designed to function with traditional alpine DIN bindings, but can be switched out for tech soles if you decide you need improved uphill performance or your suddenly with-it grandma sends you an unexpected pair of tech bindings for your b-day. Your hiking will be golden even without super-light tech bindings, though, since the Freedom leads the women's AT boot category with a 27-degree range of cuff movement; simply switch the Ride Power Block into hike mode to disengage the cuff, or lock it down to drive the 110-flex Freedom down whatever line you've been eyeing. Once you're locked in, shredding the downhill is as easy as crushing the skintrack. The Freedom is built with Carbon Core Technology, which molds the lower PU shell around a carbon-fiber frame, yielding a boot that's strong and stiff without carrying any unnecessary weight, so you can drive even burly freeride skis without worrying that they'll overwhelm your boots. The upper cuff, also made of PU, is designed to accommodate women's feet and legs, with a narrower heel, lower calf, and a higher instep that work with the heat-moldable Intuition Speed Ride liner to give you a snug, warm, and comfortable fit for the whole season.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.