Scott Voodoo 75mm Telemark Boot - Men's

Scott Voodoo 75mm Telemark Boot - Men's
$384.30 $549.00 30% off
Voodoo 75mm Telemark Boot - Men's by Scott
Price subject to change | SKU: SCO00BZ

Scott Voodoo 75mm Telemark Boot - Men's

Tele skiers always win, because when you're lunging like an '80s aerobics instructor with every turn, six inches of powder turns into full overhead. Not only do knee-droppers get more face shots, but they get to wear the Scott Voodoo 75mm Men's Telemark Boot while getting said face shots; victory's sweet, ain't it'With a burly mountain-man flex of 130, overlapping PowerWrap construction, and a big ol' power strap just for chuckles, you can ski the Voodoo as hard as you want without powering through the front and ending up forehead-down on the snow. It has an adjustable spoiler to help you customize the 13-degree lean angle, and an asymmetrical bellows design for the proper flex. Scott also used four separate injections to create the lower shell, making a boot that's laterally stiff so you can power through turns without tipping over or twisting over your ski. Although it's designed for hard-chargers, the Voodoo goes up almost as fast as it goes down, with a ski/walk switch that provides 46-degrees of cuff rotation (more than Scott's burliest alpine touring boot, if you care about that sort of thing), and a heat-moldable PWR Tour liner than hugs your foot whether you're on the way or down. Throw in some Wide-Open Buckles that won't re-latch themselves after you've unbuckled, saving you the humiliation of tearing up while you're trying to yank a buckled boot off your foot, and you'll shred circles around all your alpine friends.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.