The North Face Nuptse Purna II Boot - Women's

The North Face Nuptse Purna II Boot - Women's
$134.95
Nuptse Purna II Boot - Women's by The North Face
Price subject to change | SKU: TNF03QX

The North Face Nuptse Purna II Boot - Women's

A sleek addition to the Nuptse fur-blend boot family, The North Face Women's Nuptse Purna II Boot is an insulated, water-resistant boot that equally likes slushy city streets and snow-slicked sidewalks in mountain towns. The waterproof velvet-suede upper hits high in front but still below your knees, and a touch lower in back for calf-cuddling warmth. Synthetic sides and back rebuke dirty snow and melting crud, with waterproof reinforcements in the form of taped seams. A gusseted tongue provides one more barrier against external water entering your boot, and the 100% recycled P. E. T. ripstop cuff detail resists water like you resist your mother's three-week-long visits. PrimaLoft Eco insulation contains 70% post-consumer recycled materials and offers cozy warmth all along your foot and leg for extended winter forays from the bar to your flat, or the train station to your office. IcePick temperature-sensitive lugs give you better traction when temperatures dip and melted snow transforms into a bone-breaking sheet of of black ice. So, whether you're wearing argyle tights and a cozy sweater dress to the office, or running errands in yoga pants and a down jacket, the Purna boot keeps your foot dry, warm, and firmly anchored to the ground.

October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.