Voile V8 Ski

Voile V8 Ski
$454.96 $649.95 30% off
V8 Ski by Voile
Price subject to change | SKU: VOL000M

Voile V8 Ski

Imagine if your pickup got 40mpg, drove like a sports car, and cost as much as a hatchback. That's basically what the Voile V8 Ski does, except, you know, it's a ski and not a car. It's a fat, powder-loving touring ski, with a waist that's well over 100mm, a wide tip, and a tapered tail that help you float over deep snow like you're not even trying. It has traditional camber underfoot to provide plenty of edge grip when you hit icy patches or spend a day crushing the resort, but a rockered tip that planes over soft snow effortlessly, working with the narrower tail to let you surf and slash your way down the mountain. The V8 has a pretty tight turning radius for such a large ski, so it's easy to handle when you're navigating through tight trees and down tight chutes without giving up the stability that a large-platform ski offers at speed. It's surprisingly light, too--just eight pounds per pair in the 186--so your legs won't hate you if you need to haul it up a long approach. Voile's lively aspen core has been laminated with carbon and fiberglass to stay light and stiff, so you can push the V8's speed limit on the skin track and the descent without getting scared, but it isn't like skiing one of those "touring" skis with a sheet of metal in it. Voile's still a backcountry company through and through, so just because the V8 can charge doesn't mean it can't handle its own on the skin track, too.

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