Pinnacles National Park Fish

Due to the intermittent nature of Pinnacles' streams, the three-spined stickleback is the only native fish here. A predatory feeder, it eats predominately aquatic insects, and reaches three inches in length when full-grown. The stickleback is often observed along the Bear Gulch and South Wilderness Trails. Other fish species may swim upstream into the park from the Salinas River during floods, but they generally do not survive through the summer.

In the early 1980's, non-native catfish inhabited the reservoir. This population was eradicated in the mid-1980's by draining the reservoir and electroshocking the remaining fish. In the mid-1990's non-native green sunfish infiltrated park streams. They were considered a major threat to red-legged frogs, and were removed by electroshocking. Currently the mosquitofish is the only non-native fish species here. Although its presence has a minor impact on red-legged frogs, eradicating it is currently impractical.

$109.95
Having to put on your shoes may be a 1st-world problem, but nonetheless, sometimes you just don't want to lace up. But...
Price subject to change | Available through Backcountry.com
Featured Park
Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
Featured Wildlife
The pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.