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Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park

Established on January 26, 1915, Rocky Mountain NP is a living showcase of the grandeur of the Rocky Mountains. With elevations ranging from 8,000 feet in the wet, grassy valleys to 14,259 feet at the weather-ravaged top of Longs Peak, a visitor to the park has opportunities for countless breathtaking experiences and adventures Learn more about Rocky Mountain

Everglades National Park

Everglades National Park

Spanning the southern tip of the Florida peninsula and most of Florida Bay, Everglades National Park is the only subtropical preserve in North America. It contains both temperate and tropical plant communities, including sawgrass prairies, mangrove and cypress swamps, pinelands, and hardwood hammocks, as well as marine and estuarine environments Learn more about Everglades National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park lies at the southern extremity of the Cascade Range, which extends northward some 500 miles through Oregon and Washington and into British Columbia. Lassen Peak and the 16 other major volcanoes of the Cascades are a segment of a ring of volcanoes that circle the Pacific Ocean, known collectively as "The Pacific Circle of Fire." Learn more about Lassen Volcanic National Park

Arches National Park

Arches National Park

Arches National Park is known for its remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world. Towering spires, fins and balanced rocks complement the arches, creating a remarkable assortment of landforms in a relatively small area Learn more about Arches National Park

Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce Canyon is a small national park in southwestern Utah. Named after the Mormon Pioneer Ebenezer Bryce, Bryce Canyon became a national park in 1924. Bryce is famous for its worldly unique geology, consisting of a series of horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters carved from the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah. The erosional force of frost-wedging and the dissolving power of rainwater has shaped the colorful limestone rock of the Claron Formation into bizarre shapes including slot canyons, windows, fins, and spires called hoodoos. Learn more about Bryce Canyon National Park

Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve

Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve

Nestled in southern Colorado, North Americas tallest dunes rise over 750 feet high against the rugged Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The wind-shaped dunes glow beneath the rugged backdrop of the mountains. This geologic wonderland, containing over 30 square miles of massive dunes, became a national monument in 1932. With the passage of the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve Act, resources now also include alpine lakes and tundra, six peaks over 13,000 in elevation, ancient spruce and pine forests, large stands of aspen and cottonwood, grasslands, and wetlandsall habitat for diverse wildlife and plant species. Learn more about Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone is famous for hosting more than 10,000-plus hot springs and geysers, the majority of the planets total. Yellowstones geothermal wonders are created by one of the worlds largest active volcanoes; its last eruption caused a crater or caldera that spans almost half of the parks size. We cant forget about Yellowstones most famous geyser, Old Faithful. Old Faithful erupts more frequently than any of the other big geysers and is still as spectacular as it was a century ago. Learn more about Yellowstone National Park