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Sequoia And Kings Canyon National Park Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park

Land of Giants

These parks are home to giants: immense mountains, deep canyons, and huge trees. Thanks to their huge elevational range, 1,500' to 14,491', these parks protect stunningly diverse habitats. The Generals Highway climbs over 5000 feet from chaparral and oak-studded foothills to the awe-inspiring sequoia groves. From there, trails lead to the high-alpine wilderness which makes up most of these parks. Beneath the surface lie over 200 fascinating caverns.

Although Congress created these two parks at different times, Sequoia and Kings Canyon share miles of boundary and are managed as one park. Sequoia was the second national park designated in this country. General Grant National Park, the forerunner of Kings Canyon, was third.

As you explore this landscape of giants, do so in step with nature. Be aware that human activity may conflict with natural events. One example: human - bear interactions can result in problems for both players. Store all food properly and learn other ways to keep your parks healthy and wild. And stay safe! Rivers are especially dangerous now.

And stay safe! Rivers are especially dangerous now. Several people have drowned this year, and there have been frightening rescues. Please be careful, and supervise children near any water. Enjoy a safe visit to these wonderful parks.