Shenandoah National Park Geology

The casual observer may sense that there is no geologic activity at Shenandoah National Park. Certainly there are no active volcanoes or glaciers, but geologic events do occur here. Freezing and thawing result in rockfalls and spawling from cliff faces. Severe thunderstorms and hurricanes can produce large quantities of rainfall, which, in turn, causes flooding and associated erosion as well as landslides. Most often these events are relatively small. At times, forest disturbances seem to conspire with one another. A wildland fire may kill trees. An ice storm or windstorm may bring those trees down, partially up rooting them from the ground. This might set circumstances up for a severe rainstorm to cause significant erosion and mass wasting. Clearly both the forest and the landscape it occupies are undergoing constant change.

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December's Featured Park
Zion National Park, a place home to the Narrows, Canyon Overlook, Emerald Pools, a petrified forest, a desert swamp, springs and waterfalls, hanging gardens, wildflowers, wildlife and more!
December's Animal
The bighorn sheep is the mammalian symbol of Colorado Parks and Wildlife and Colorado's official animal. Colorado is home to the largest population of the species anywhere. The animals are five to six feet long with a tail three to six inches in length.