Shenandoah National Park Geology

The casual observer may sense that there is no geologic activity at Shenandoah National Park. Certainly there are no active volcanoes or glaciers, but geologic events do occur here. Freezing and thawing result in rockfalls and spawling from cliff faces. Severe thunderstorms and hurricanes can produce large quantities of rainfall, which, in turn, causes flooding and associated erosion as well as landslides. Most often these events are relatively small. At times, forest disturbances seem to conspire with one another. A wildland fire may kill trees. An ice storm or windstorm may bring those trees down, partially up rooting them from the ground. This might set circumstances up for a severe rainstorm to cause significant erosion and mass wasting. Clearly both the forest and the landscape it occupies are undergoing constant change.

$199.95
A perfect place for the family reunion or the post-ride union of beers. The Big Agnes Three Forks Shelter's gargantuan...
Price subject to change | Available through Backcountry.com
October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.