Shenandoah National Park Springs and Seeps

Current, clear information regarding the location and condition of springs and seeps is lacking for Shenandoah National Park. One report (DeKay 1972) indicates that there are as many as 854 surface water sources in the park. It is unclear whether or not this number represents springs alone or if other surface waters (streams primarily) are included. Most information about springs in the park has focused on roughly 70 springs that are located near Skyline Drive or along the Appalachian Trail. Park staff members have prepared a request for funding to support an investigation to learn more about these important water resources.

Public Health Connections

Water at springs and seeps can contain microbes which can make humans sick, even if wildlife drink it without serious effects. All backcountry water, including spring water, should be boiled for at least one minute, filtered, or treated with purification tablets before drinking.

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Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
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