Yellowstone National Park Day Hikes in Canyon Area

Day Hikes Near Canyon Village Begin your hike by stopping at a ranger station or visitor center for information. Trail conditions may change suddenly and unexpectedly. Bear activity, rain or snow storms, high water, and fires may temporarily close trails.

Canyon Rims

There are numerous trails and viewpoints of the canyon falls, both from the north and south rim.

Mary Mountain Trail

This trail climbs gradually up over Mary Mountain and the park's Central Plateau to the Nez Perce trailhead between Madison and Old Faithful.. Elk and bison can sometimes

be seen in the distant meadows. The trail through Hayden Valley is often difficult to follow as bison regularly knock down the trail markers.

Trailhead: North of Alum Creek pullout, 4 miles south of Canyon Junction

Distance: 21 miles one way

Level of Difficulty: Moderately strenuous due to length

Howard Eaton Trail

This hike, with little vertical rise, will take 2-8 hours. It passes through forest, meadow, and marshland to Cascade Lake (3 mi; 4.8 km), Grebe Lake (4.25 mi; 6.8 km), Wolf Lake (6.25 mi; 10 km), Ice Lake (8.25 mi; 13.7 km), and Norris Campground (12 mi; 19.3 km). Most years, this trail remains very wet and muddy through July. Insects can be very annoying.

Trailhead: 0.5 miles (0.8 km) west of Canyon Junction on the Norris-Canyon Road

Distance: From 3-12 miles one way, depending on destination

Level of Difficulty: Moderately easy

Cascade Lake Trail

This hike takes 3 hours and is an enjoyable walk through open meadows and over small creeks for those with limited time. Look for wildlife and wildflowers in season. Most years, this trail remains very wet and muddy through July.

Trailhead: Cascade Lake Picnic Area, 1.5 miles north of Canyon Jct. on the Tower-Canyon Road.

Distance: 4.5 miles (7.2 km) roundtrip

Level of Difficulty: Easy

Observation Peak

Hike to Cascade Lake from either of its two trailheads. From the lake, this strenuous, 1,400 foot climb in 3 miles will take roughly 3 hours. The hike takes you to a high mountain peak for an outstanding view of the Yellowstone wilderness. The trail passes through open meadows and some whitebark pine forests. Past Cascade Lake, no water is available along the trail. Not recommended for persons with heart and/or respiratory problems.

Trailhead: Cascade Lake Picnic Area, 1.5 miles north of Canyon Jct. on the Tower- Canyon Road. The other trailhead is accessed from a pullout 1/4 mile west of Canyon on the Norris-Canyon Road.

Distance: 11 miles roundtrip

Level of Difficulty: Strenuous

Grebe Lake Trail

There is little vertical rise on this 3-4 hour hike. This trail follows an old fire road through meadows and forest, some of which burned during the fires of 1988. Once at the lake you can connect with the Howard Eaton Trail.

Trailhead: 3.5 miles (5.6 km) west of Canyon Junction on the Norris-Canyon Road

Distance: 6 miles (9.7 km) roundtrip

Level of Difficulty: Moderately easy

Seven Mile Hole Trail

This hike takes 6-8 hours to complete. Following the Canyon Rim for the first 1.5 miles (2.4 km), you will be rewarded with views of Silver Cord Cascade. Continue north another 0.5 mile (0.8 km) to join the Washburn Spur Trail; at 3 miles (4.8 km), the trail drops off to Seven Mile Hole, a 1.5 mile (2.4 km), 1,400 foot (425 m) drop. Hike it carefully, watch your footing, and conserve your energy. Depending on your condition and the weather, it can be a long hike back out. Be especially careful where the trail passes both dormant and active hot springs. Off-trail travel is prohibited. Not recommended for persons with heart and/or respiratory problems.

Trailhead: Glacial Boulder Trailhead on Inspiration Point Road

Distance: 11 miles (17.7 km) roundtrip

Level of Difficulty: Strenuous

Washburn Trail/Washburn Spur Trail

This hike begins at the Dunraven Pass trailhead to Mount Washburn and ends at the Glacial Boulder on Inspiration Point Road. This strenuous hike takes 6-8 hours to complete. Starting at the Washburn Trailhead at Dunraven Pass, you ascend Mt. Washburn on a trail complete with (in season) wildflowers, bighorn sheep, and spectacular views. After this three mile ascent, the Washburn Spur Trail descends very steeply from the east side of the Fire Lookout to Washburn Hot Springs in another 3.7 miles (6 km). Here you will find some interesting thermal features, including mud pots. Continue past the turnoff to Seven Mile Hole and follow the trail to the Glacial Boulder and the Canyon area. Not recommended for persons with heart and/or respiratory problems.

Trailhead: Dunraven Pass, Washburn Trailhead, 4.5 miles north of Canyon Junction

Distance: 11.5 miles (18.5 km) one way

Level of Difficulty: Strenuous

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