California Coastal National Monument

Description:

Located off the 1,100 miles of California coastline, the California Coastal National Monument comprises more than 20,000 small islands, rocks, exposed reefs, and pinnacles between Mexico and Oregon. The scenic qualities and critical habitat of this public resource are protected as part of the National Landscape Conservation System, administered by the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior. The Monument provides forage, breeding grounds and haul-outs for significant populations of birds and sea mammals.

Directions:

From Santa Cruz, CA

  1. Head north on Chestnut St toward Rincon St 118 ft
    1. Slight left onto Chestnut Street Extension 0.2 mi
    2. Take the 1st left onto CA-1 N/?Mission St Continue to follow CA-1 N 1.9 mi
    3. Turn left onto Western Dr 413 ft
    4. Turn right onto Mission St 262 ft
    5. Take the 1st left onto Natural Bridges Dr. Destination will be on the left

      Phone:

      (831) 421-9546

      Email:

      ccnm@blm.gov

      Address:

      Bureau of Land Management California Coastal National Monument 400 Natural Bridges Drive Santa Cruz, CA 95060

      Activities:

      Wildlife Viewing

      Organization:

      BLM - Bureau of Land Management

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Currently Viewing California Coastal National Monument