Las Cienegas National Conservation Area

Description:

In a state where desert arroyos, washes, and many streambeds remain bone-dry most of the time, the year-round flow of Cienega Creek makes it a highly valuable resource. A lush green ribbon of vegetation defines one of the most significant riparian zones in southern Arizona. Cienega Creek gets its name from the cienegas, or marshes, which occur along its length. This rare vegetation community has nearly disappeared in the Southwest. The national conservation area includes a working cattle ranch. Visitors are asked to leave all gates as they are found. There is no trash pick up, so visitors need to pack up all trash. The area is a travel corridor for illegal immigrants traveling from Mexico. Visitors should report all suspected illegal activities to BLM or local law enforcement authorities and stay safe by avoiding contact with persons exhibiting suspicious behavior or engaged in dangerous activities.

Directions:

From Tucson, go east on I-10 and then south on 83 to the wildlife area turnoff near milepost 40.

Phone:

(520) 258-7200

Email:

BLM_AZ_TFOWEB@blm.gov

Address:

Tucson Field Office 3201 East Universal Way Tucson, AZ 85746

Activities:

Biking Camping Hiking Horseback Riding Hunting Picnicking Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

BLM - Bureau of Land Management

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Currently Viewing Las Cienegas National Conservation Area
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Currently Viewing Las Cienegas National Conservation Area