Canyonlands National Park Nonnative Species

Non-native species are a problem throughout the American west, and Canyonlands is no exception. Several animal and plant infestations have significantly altered the area's ecology, disrupting food chains and nutrient cycles by out-competing native organisms in their own habitat. Non-native plants impacting Canyonlands include tamarisk (salt cedar), cheat grass, Russian knapweed and Russian olive. There are also 40 species of non-native fish living in the upper basin of the Colorado River, which includes Canyonlands. Two of these, carp and channel catfish, are the most commonly seen fish in the park. Non-native birds, such as starlings and English sparrows, typically inhabit urban areas and are not a problem in the park..Many scientific studies have been conducted to understand the impact of these species and, in some cases, to eradicate them. Thus far, success has been limited, and the issue of non-native species is likely to receive continued attention in the coming years.

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Featured Park
Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
Featured Wildlife
The pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.
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