Francis Marion and Sumter National Forests

Description:

 Recreation on the Francis Marion and Sumter National Forests is as varied as the South Carolina landscape from the mountains to the coast. Click a link to activity of your choice in the left column of this page to explore two forests full of opportunities! We'll post cautions and weather closures in the conditions report below, but please......  Call Before You Haul!Conditions may change quickly! Please check the Call Before You Haul telephone hotline at  (803) 561-4025 for the most recent trail closures and openings. The hotline will provide you with the most current updates. Trails are frequently closed after prolonged or heavy rainfall when usage would result in resource damage. The website is updated on weekdays only. It is not updated on weekends or federal holidays.Please note: The date recorded in the hotline trail report reflects the date the trail was opened or closed. The message will remain the same until the open/closed status changes.

Directions:

Phone:

Email:

kristimoore@fs.fed.us

Address:

, SC

Activities:

Biking Boating Camping Fishing Hiking Horseback Riding Hunting Off Highway Vehicle Picnicking Recreational Vehicles Visitor Center Wildlife Viewing Swimming Horse Camping

Organization:

FS - USDA Forest Service

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Currently Viewing Francis Marion and Sumter National Forests
Featured Park
Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
Featured Wildlife
The pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.
Currently Viewing Francis Marion and Sumter National Forests