Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is located seven miles west of the city of Boynton Beach in Palm Beach County, Florida. The refuge was established in 1951 under the authority of the Migratory Bird Conservation Act and is managed through a license agreement between the South Florida Water Management District and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In total, the refuge includes 145,800 acres of northern Everglades habitat. The refuge contains one of three water conservation areas (WCA's) in south Florida and is maintained to provide water storage and flood control, as well as habitat for native fish and wildlife populations. Water is regulated by a series of pumps, canals, water control structures, and levees built by the Army Corps of Engineers. These freshwater storage areas and part of the Everglades National Park are all that remain of the original Everglades.

Directions:

The refuge is located about 10 miles west of Boynton Beach, Florida. It is accessible from Interstate 95 and the Florida Turnpike by going west on either Boynton Beach Blvd or Atlantic Ave in Delray Beach, until you reach Highway 441/State Road 7. From Boynton Beach Blvd., proceed south on Hwy 441/SR7 for two miles and turn west onto Lee Road.

Phone:

561-732-3684

Email:

loxahatchee@fws.gov

Address:

10216 Lee Road Boynton Beach, FL 33437

Activities:

Boating Fishing Hiking Hunting Visitor Center Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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