Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Bear Lake Refuge is located in southeast Idaho, seven miles south of Montpelier. Surrounded by mountains, it lies in Bear Lake Valley at an elevation ranging from 5,925 feet on the marsh to 6,800 feet on the rocky slopes of Merkley Mountain. The refuge office is located in Montpelier. The 19,000 acre refuge is comprised mainly of a bulrush marsh, open water, and flooded meadows of sedges, rushes, and grasses. Portions of the refuge include scattered grasslands and brush-covered slopes. Bear Lake Refuge encompasses what is locally referred to as Dingle Swamp or Dingle Marsh. Along with Bear Lake proper, the marsh was once part of a larger prehistoric lake that filled the valley. As it drained and receded, Dingle Marsh was reduced from 25,000 acres to less than 17,000 before it became part of the refuge.

Directions:

The office is in Montpelier, Idaho. To get there, travel east on Webster Street, off Route 30. Turn south off Route 89 onto a gravel road approximately half way between Montpelier and Ovid. This turnoff is marked. Continue south for about 5 miles until you reach the refuge boundary.

Phone:

208-847-1757

Email:

Rob_Bundy@fws.gov

Address:

370 Webster St Montpelier, ID 83254

Activities:

Auto Touring Boating Fishing Hunting

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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Currently Viewing Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge