Chickasaw National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Established August 5, 1985, Chickasaw National Wildlife Refuge lies in the Lower Mississippi River floodplain along the Chickasaw Bluff in western Tennessee. Chickasaw NWR currently encompasses 25,006 acres and includes the largest block of bottomland hardwood forest in Tennessee. Chickasaw NWR and adjacent lands are known to be important wintering and stop-over areas for a large portion of the Mississippi Flyway mallard population. Under optimum conditions, peak waterfowl numbers may exceed 250,000 including black ducks, gadwall, pintail, teal, wigeon, wood duck, ring-necked duck, and hooded merganser.

Directions:

From Ripley and Highway 51, proceed approximately 6 miles north on Edith-Central Road (becomes Edith-Nankipoo after passing through 4-way stop at Edith). Turn left on Hobe Webb road and proceed approximately 1.5 miles to first road on the right. Turn right on Sand Bluff Road and proceed to the bottom of bluff. Refuge headquarters will be on the left.

Phone:

731-635-7621

Email:

chickasaw@fws.gov

Address:

1505 Sand Bluff Road Ripley, TN 38063

Activities:

Auto Touring Boating Interpretive Programs Fishing Hiking Hunting Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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