Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge, one of the hidden jewels of the Refuge System, is located on the east slope of the Cascade Mountains at the base of 12,307-foot Mount Adams in southern Washington. It currently encompasses over 6,500 acres of the historic Conboy/Camas lakebeds, a shallow marshy wetland area drained by early settlers. Conifer forests, grasslands, shallow wetlands, and deep water provide homes for deer, elk, beaver, coyote, otter, small rodents, and 150 species of birds, as well as numerous amphibians, reptiles, and fish. Bald eagle, greater sandhill crane, and the Oregon spotted frog are species of concern. Refuge visitors enjoy the scenery, hike the Willard Springs trail, and observe wildlife from the county roads that surround and cross the refuge.

Directions:

The Conboy Lake Refuge headquarters is located 5 miles southwest of Glenwood, Washington, off the Glenwood-Troutdale Highway. Conboy Lake is a one-person station, so the office may or may not be open daily.

Phone:

509-364-3410

Email:

Yvette_Donovan@fws.gov

Address:

100 Wildlife Refuge Rd Box 5 Glenwood, WA 98619

Activities:

Fishing Hiking Hunting

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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