Conscience Point National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

The Conscience Point National Wildlife Refuge was established July 20, 1971 as a land gift from Stanley Howard. The 60-acre refuge is located in the Town of North Sea on the north shore of Long Island's south fork. The refuge protects grasslands, oak-beech forest, shrub habitats, kettle holes, freshwater marsh and saltmarsh. The refuge grasslands are a habitat model for maritime grasslands, a disappearing habitat type on Long Island due to development. Maritime grasslands are native grasslands composed of little bluestem grass, switch grass, poverty grass, hairgrass, and Prickly pear cactus. Wildlife on the refuge is as diverse as its habitats. Waterfowl are primarily black ducks and bufflehead. The grasslands are being managed and enlarged specifically to attract grassland dependent birds such as grasshopper sparrow, eastern meadowlark, savannah sparrow and bobolink. Due to its coastal location, the refuge is heavily used by migratory songbirds, shorebirds and raptors. The refuge also supports endangered and threatened species.

Directions:

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Phone:

631-286-0485

Email:

longislandrefuges@fws.gov

Address:

N/A North Sea, NY

Activities:

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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