Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1992 to preserve a large, natural wetland complex. The 1,825-acre refuge is located in central Minnesota and serves as an important stop for many species of migrating birds. It harbors one of the largest nesting populations of greater sandhill cranes in Minnesota. Habitats include native tallgrass prairie, oak savanna, and wetlands with dense stands of wild rice. The refuge serves as the base for the Federal private lands program in Morrison County, which focuses on restoring drained wetlands through voluntary agreements with landowners. Acquisition of land for Crane Meadows is continuing as funding is available.

Directions:

Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge is located in Central Minnesota, approximately 30 miles north of St. Cloud and 6 miles southeast of Little Falls. From Little Falls, follow State Highway 10 south approximately 2 miles and prepare for a left lane exit to County Highway 35 East. Travel approximately 4.5 miles to the Platte River Bridge and, after crossing the bridge, take the first left to the Platte River Trailhead and refuge headquarters. From St. Cloud, take State Highway 10 north approximately 25 miles to County Highway 35 East. Travel approximately 4.5 miles to the Platte River Bridge and, after crossing the bridge, take the first left to the Platte River Trailhead and refuge headquarters.

Phone:

320-632-1575

Email:

cranemeadows@fws.gov

Address:

19502 Iris Road Little Falls, MN 56345

Activities:

Hiking Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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