Elizabeth A. Morton National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Established December 27, 1954, through a donation by the Morton family, the 187-acre Elizabeth A. Morton National Wildlife Refuge boasts exceptionally diverse habitats including bay beach, a brackish pond, a freshwater pond, kettle holes, tidal flats, saltmarsh, freshwater marsh, shrub, grasslands, maritime oak forest, and red cedar. The refuge's diversity is not only critical to Long Island wildlife, but its picturesque quality is nothing short of an advertisement in a travel magazine! Habitats along the beach attract many species including nesting piping plovers, roseate terns, least terns, common terns, and shorebirds. The waters surrounding the refuge are considered critical habitat for juvenile Kemp's Ridley sea turtles and are occasionally used by loggerhead sea turtles. Waterfowl use of the refuge peaks during the colder months. Long-tailed ducks, white winged scoter, goldeneye and black ducks will most likely be spotted during winter. Much of the refuge is situated on a peninsula surrounded by Noyack and Little Peconic Bays. The north/south orientation of the peninsula makes the refuge important habitat for shorebirds, raptors and songbirds as they navigate the coastline during migration.

Directions:

Sunrise Highway (Route 27) to Southampton, north onto North Sea Road (Route 38) for North Sea. Right onto Noyack Road and continue for 5 miles. Refuge entrance in on the left.

Phone:

631-286-0485

Email:

longislandrefuges@fws.gov

Address:

784 Noyack Rd. Sag Harbor, NY 11963

Activities:

Historic & Cultural Site Interpretive Programs Fishing Hiking Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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