Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), located in south-central North Dakota, was established in 1932 as a migratory bird refuge by President Herbert Hoover. The 22,300 acre refuge consists of a 15,000-acre saline basin that is 18 miles long and is appropriately named "Long Lake." Long Lake is relatively shallow; it is normally 3 to 4 feet deep. During extended wet periods, Long Lake reaches depths up to seven feet.

The shallow depths and lengths of meandering shoreline provide vast expanses of habitat that attract migrating and nesting species of waterfowl, shorebirds, and rare migrant birds. In recognition of the Refuge's significance in the ongoing effort to conserve wild birds and their habitat, Long Lake was designated as a "Globally Important Bird Area" in 2001. Also, due to the special importance of Long Lake NWR to migrating shorebirds, the Refuge was recently recognized as a "Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network" site.

Directions:

Long Lake NWR is located about 3 miles southeast of Moffit, North Dakota. From U.S. Highway 94 at Sterling, North Dakota, turn south on U.S. Highway 83. Proceed 12 miles south to Moffit, North Dakota. Turn east on 128th Avenue SE and follow the signs to Refuge headquarters. The visitor center is located on the north side of the lake.

Phone:

701-387-4397

Email:

longlake@fws.gov

Address:

12000 353 ST SE Moffit, ND 58560

Activities:

Interpretive Programs Hunting

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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