Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge is located in central lower Michigan, approximately 25 miles south of Saginaw Bay. It was established in 1953 to provide habitat for migratory waterfowl. Known locally as the "Shiawassee Flats," the refuge lies in the Saginaw Bay watershed, historically one of the largest and most productive wetland ecosystems in Michigan. Four rivers converge on the refuge - the Tittabawassee, Flint, Cass, and Shiawassee.

Directions:

The refuge headquarters is 5 miles south of Saginaw. From I-75, take the Bridgeport exit and turn west onto Dixie Highway; go 1/2 mile. Turn left onto Fort Road, and go about 2 miles. Turn west onto Curtis Road, and go about 4 miles to refuge headquarters. The Green Point Environmental Learning Center is in the southwest corner of Saginaw. From I-75, take the M-46 West/Holland Ave. exit, and go 5 miles. Turn left onto Michigan Avenue, and go 1 mile. Turn left onto Maple Street, and go 1/2 mile to the Center.

Phone:

989-777-5930

Email:

shiawassee@fws.gov

Address:

6975 Mower Road Saginaw, MI 48601

Activities:

Auto Touring Biking Boating Interpretive Programs Fishing Hiking Hunting Winter Sports Wildlife Viewing Photography

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

$104.96 30% off
Click into your pedals and spin down the soaking wet bike path with the Seal Line Urban Backpack carrying your laptop...
Price subject to change | Available through Backcountry.com
Currently Viewing Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge
Featured Park
Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
Featured Wildlife
The pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.
Currently Viewing Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge