Great Smoky Mountains National Park Wildlife Watching

Most visitors understand that feeding wildlife is against the law, but many people do not realize that disturbing park wildlife is also a violation of federal regulations and can result in fines and arrest. The law protecting wildlife in the park is contained in the Code of Federal Regulations. It states that the "feeding, touching, teasing, frightening, or intentional disturbing" of wildlife is prohibited. As a rule of thumb, if you approach an animal so closely that it changes its behavior, you have approached too closely. Use binoculars, spotting scopes and cameras with telephoto lenses to enjoy wildlife.

Watch for any modification in an animal's behavior. This indicates that you have approached too closely. Move away from the animal until you reach a distance at which the animal feels comfortable once again and resumes whatever activity it was engaged in before you approached. Never feed wildlife or bait animals for closer observation or photography. Feeding park wildlife usually guarantees its demise.

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Featured Park
Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
Featured Wildlife
The pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.