Mesa Verde National Park Activities

Point Lookout , a landform visible from the park entrance. (NPS Photo) Park schedules vary seasonally. Click on more>>link below for Park schedules.

1/2 DAY OR LESS:

Plan to spend at least 3 hours at Mesa Verde. 2 hours of this time will be spent driving in and out of the park. Your first stop should be at the Far View Visitor Center, 15 miles from the park entrance, for information and orientation. Visit the Chapin Mesa Museum and Spruce Tree House. Another option is to drive the Mesa Top Loop Drive.

ONE DAY:

Stop at the Far View Visitor Center for information and orientation. Purchase tour tickets for a Cliff Palace or Balcony House tour. Visit the Chapin Mesa Museum and Spruce Tree House. Drive the Mesa Top Loop Road.

TWO DAYS OR MORE:

Day one -

Visit the Far View Visitor Center to purchase tour tickets for a Cliff Palace or Balcony House Tour. Visit the Chapin Mesa Museum and Spruce Tree House. Explore your hiking opportunities near the museum.

Day two -

Purchase tickets to Cliff Palace or Balcony House, depending on what you visited yesterday. Drive the Mesa Top Loop Road. Take time to enjoy the wayside exhibits and overlooks. Visit Far View Sites Complex. Finish the day by taking another hike near the museum, on the Mesa Top Loop Road, or near the campground. Another option is to visit Wetherill Mesa to tour Long House or Step House.

Purchase your $2.75 tour tickets for Cliff Palace, Balcony House and Long House at the Far View Visitor Center.

$599.95
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