Keweenaw National Historical Park

From over 7,000 years ago to the 1960s people quarried or mined the rich copper deposits of the Keweenaw Peninsula. Native peoples first fashioned the copper into tools and trade items. More recently came the eastern investors and immigrants in one of the nation's first large mineral rushes.

Copper built thriving industries and cosmopolitan communities in this remote, wild place. Mining companies like Calumet and Hecla and Quincy left a lasting mark on the land, communities and people. When the mines closed, their loss brought hardship and heartache.

Today, Keweenaw National Historical Park preserves the history and heritage of copper mining. The park also preserves the many stories associated with copper: stories of human struggle, ingenuity, vision and conflict.

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