Sagamore Hill National Historic Site

Sagamore Hill was the home of Theodore Roosevelt, 26th President of the United States, from 1885 until his death in 1919. From 1902 to 1908 his "Summer White House" was the focus of international attention. Otherwise, it was the home of a most remarkable fellow.

Theodore Roosevelt, a family-centered father of six, ended his workday at 4 PM to play with his children. Often a man of contradiction, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and the Congressional Medal of Honor. He was a diplomat, internationalist, naval historian and strategist, combat commander of a volunteer cavalry regiment, and Assistant Secretary of the Navy. As a noted historian, biographer, essayist, editor, columnist, and critic, he wrote 35 books. He was a renowned ornithologist, an expert on and hunter of big-game animals, but also a pioneering American conservationist. He was a country squire, horseman, socialite and patron of the arts. He reformed the federal civil service and New York City police department, lost a race for New York City mayor, finished second in a 1912 third party bid for president, arrested outlaws as a North Dakota deputy sheriff, served as Governor of New York and Vice-President of the United States.

Today, Sagamore Hill is furnished as it was during his busy lifetime.

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