Yellowstone National Park Mudpots

Yellowstone National Park

Where hot water is limited and hydrogen sulfide gas is present (emitting the rotten egg smell common to thermal areas), sulfuric acid is generated. The acid dissolves the surrounding rock into fine particles of silica and clay that mix with what little water there is to form the seething and bubbling mudpots. The sights, sounds, and smells of areas like Artist and Fountain paint pots and Mud Volcano make these curious features some of the most memorable in the park.

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