Yosemite National Park Pets

Some visitors choose to bring pets along on their vacations. In Yosemite, pets have a few rules to follow: Pets are only allowed in developed areas on roads on fully paved trails and roads in campgrounds (except Tamarack Flat, Porcupine Flat, and walk-in campgrounds) Pets are not allowed on unpaved or poorly paved trails in wilderness areas on shuttle buses in concession lodging areas in Tamarack Flat, Porcupine Flat, and all walk-in campgrounds Pets must be restrained on a leash not more than six feet long or otherwise physically restrained Pets may not be left unattended For the courtesy of other visitors, human companions are responsible for cleaning up and depositing pet feces in trash receptacles

A few places where pets are allowed, contrary to the general prohibition regarding pets on unpaved roads: the Meadow Loop and Four Mile fire roads in Wawona, on the Carlon Road, and on the Old Big Oak Flat Road between Hodgdon Meadow and Hazel Green Creek.

A kennel is available in Yosemite Valley from Memorial Day through Labor Day. More information is available on the DNC Parks Resorts at Yosemite web site.

These regulations protect both pets and wildlife from disease and each other. The National Park Service has prohibited pets on trails for many years. In particular, dogs chase wildlife, pollute water sources, and can become defensive and dangerous in unfamiliar surroundings. Pet owners have the burden to assure their pet does not damage the park values for others in those areas where pets are allowed.

$499.95
Next time ski patrol grills you for ollieing slow signs, spraying jerries, and boosting off knolls, you can honestly say...
Price subject to change | Available through Backcountry.com
Featured Park
Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
Featured Wildlife
The pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.